HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN
(1805-1875)

Originally published as part of Andersen’s fifth volume of Fairy Tales in 1848, DEN LILLE PIGE MED SVOVLSTIKKERNE (The Little Match Girl) is an original Andersen story inspired by a Johan Thomas Lundbye drawing and loosely based on an incident that happened to Andersen’s mother when she was a child.

Nine years after his friend Charles Dickens finished OLIVER TWIST, Andersen wrote LITTLE MATCH GIRL to shed a light on an oppressed and silent group in Europe; its children. Andersen’s timeless short story did not only speak out for exploited children sent by their parents to beg in the streets, but also for children of all economic brackets living at the time when one out of every two children routinely died before the age of five. Faithful to Andersen’s original intent, the 2018 live action short film LITTLE MATCH GIRL is as much a mirror for our indifference today as it was in 1845.

 

”Life itself is the most wonderful fairy tale.”

H. C. Andersen

Hans Christian Andersen grew up on the Danish island Fyn. He was born in the poor neighbourhood of the town Odense in a one-room house (today the Hans Christian Andersen Museum). When Andersen was two years old, his family moved to another house (today named the Hans Christian Anderson’s Childhood Home) where he grew up. When Andersen was 11 years old his father died and Hans Christian was left to himself. He went to school once in a while and spent most of his time learning stories instead of learning to read.

H. C. Andersen is best remembered for his fairy tales. Andersen’s popularity is not limited to children: his stories express themes that transcend age and nationality. Andersen’s fairy tales have been translated into more than 125 languages, readily accessible to children, but presenting lessons of virtue and resilience in the face of adversity for mature readers as well.

 

“I seize on an idea for grown-ups, and then tell the story to the little ones while always remembering that Father and Mother often listen, and you must also give them something for their minds.”

H. C. Andersen

Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875) grew up on the Danish island Fyn. He was born in the poor neighbourhood of the town Odense in a one-room house (today the Hans Christian Andersen Museum). When Andersen was two years old, his family moved to another house (today named the Hans Christian Anderson’s Childhood Home) where he grew up. When Andersen was 11 years old his father died and Hans Christian was left to himself. He went to school once in a while and spent most of his time learning stories instead of learning to read.

H. C. Andersen is best remembered for his fairy tales. Andersen’s popularity is not limited to children: his stories express themes that transcend age and nationality. Andersen’s fairy tales have been translated into more than 125 languages, readily accessible to children, but presenting lessons of virtue and resilience in the face of adversity for mature readers as well.

 

“I seize on an idea for grown-ups, and then tell the story to the little ones while always remembering that Father and Mother often listen, and you must also give them something for their minds.”

H. C. Andersen

 

Some of H. C. Andersen’s most famous fairy tales include THE LITTLE MATCH GIRL, THE EMPEROR’S NEW CLOTHES, THE LITTLE MERMAID, THE NIGHTINGALE, THE SNOW QUEEN, THE UGLY DUCKLING, THUMBELINA.

For more information, please visit

H. C. ANDERSEN – MUSEUM

H. C. ANDERSEN – BIRTHPLACE

H. C. ANDERSEN – CHILDHOOD HOME